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Így fognak Szuhojt az USAF pilótái

Az Amerikai Egyesült Államok Légiereje (USAF) a 493. Századból delegált F-15C elfogóvadászokat a NATO Baltic Air Policing légtérvédelmi feladatra. Jövő héten érkezik a váltás, az Eagle-lovagok pedig posztoltak egy videót, hogyan fogtak Szuhoj Szu-30-asokat a Balti-tenger felett.

Fórum hozzászólások

  • Terminator
    06.10–06.16.

    On June 10 – 16 NATO fighter aircraft conducting the NATO Air Policing Mission in the Baltic states were scrambled six times to identify and escort military aircraft of the Russian Federation in international airspace over the Baltic Sea.



    On June 10 NATO air policing fighter aircraft intercepted one AN-24 flying from Kaliningrad to mainland Russia. The AN-24 had its onboard transponder switched on but malfunctioning, it was flying according to a pre-filed flight plan and maintained radio communication with the regional air traffic control centre. The NATO fight aircraft also identified one AN-26 flying from Kaliningrad to mainland Russia with its onboard transponder on, according to a flight plan, and maintaining the radio contact.



    On June 13 NATO fighter jets intercepted one IL-20 flying from Kaliningrad to the mainland of the Russian Federation with its onboard transponder off, according to a pre-filed flight plan, without maintaining radio communication.



    On June 14 NATO air policing fighter aircraft intercepted two SU-24s flying from and back to Kaliningrad with their onboard transponders off, without the flight plans, without maintaining radio communication.



    On June 14 NATO fighter aircraft carried out an alert scramble to intercept a SU-35 flying from mainland Russia to Kaliningrad with its onboard transponder off, without the flight plan, without keeping radio contact.



    On June 15 NATO fighter jets intercepted two SU-24s flying from and back to Kaliningrad with their onboard transponders off, without the flight plans, without maintaining radio communication.



    On June 15 NATO fight aircraft intercepted one IL-76 and one SU-35 flying from Kliningrad to mainland Russia. The IL-76 had its onboard transponder on, maintained radio communication, but did not have the flight plan. The SU-35 shad its onboard transponder off, did not have the flight plan, and did not keep radio communication.

    06.17 - 06.23.


    On June 17 – 23 NATO fighter aircraft conducting the NATO Air Policing Mission in the Baltic states were scrambled two times to identify and escort military aircraft of the Russian Federation in international airspace over the Baltic Sea.



    On June 17 NATO Baltic Air Policing fighter aircraft intercepted one AN-24 flying from Kaliningrad to the mainland of the Russian Federation without using its onboard transponder, according to a pre-filed flight plan, maintaining radio communication with the regional air traffic control centre.



    On June 22 NATO fighter aircraft intercepted one TU-154 and two SU-24MRs and two SU-30SM in its escorts flying from Kaliningrad to mainland Russia. The TU-154 had is onboard transponder on, did not have the flight plan, did not maintain radio communication with the regional air traffic control centre. The two SU-24MRs and the two SU-30SMs had their onboard transponders off, did not have the flight plans, did not maintain radio communication.
  • Busy times for the Royal Air Force operating out of Ämari Air Base in Estonia

    On 25 June 2019, RAF Typhoons were scrambled twice in one day to intercept Russian military aircraft flying close to Estonian airspace.

    The Typhoons first intercepted a Russian Federation - Aerospace Forces (RF VKS) An-12 military transport aircraft (most probably An-12BK with serial RF-12561 and bort number 16 red). Later, two RF VKS Su-27 Flanker fighters (of which one was Su-27P with serial RF-33749 and bort number 93 red) and an Ilyushin Il-22 military transport aircraft were intercepted.

    The Typhoons, assigned to 11(F)sq but commanded during their deployment by the 121 Expeditionary Air Wing (EAW) as part of Operation Azotize, are deployed as part of the NATO enhanced Air Policing, and such intercepts have become routine.

    The Quick Reaction Alert (QRA) pilot of the first intercept reported: “We were scrambled to intercept a single aircraft that was flying down the Finnish/Estonian border from the East. We were tasked to identify and shadow the aircraft; which is part of a standard protocol.

    “We identified the contact as an An-12 (Cub) and shadowed it in a westerly direction. Once the task was completed we were cleared to leave the contact and conduct training in segregated Estonian airspace.”

    On the second scramble one of the Typhoon pilots commented:
    “We were scrambled to intercept three contacts which were transiting from northwest Russia around Estonia to Kaliningrad. We were tasked to identify the contacts and shadow them.

    “We intercepted the aircraft off the West coast of Estonia, identified the contacts as an Il-22 (Coot-B) and two Su-27 Flanker fighters. The contacts were shadowed southbound, before handing them over to Swedish QRA aircraft: two Saab JAS39 Gripens.”

    Photo credit: UK MoD, Crown copyright


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  • "An RAF Typhoon from No. 11 Sqn currently attached to 121 Expeditionary Air Wing at Ämari Air Base in Estonia intercepts a Russian IL-76 military transport aircraft flying close to Estonian airspace earlier this week."

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  • Terminator
    06.17 - 06.23.


    On June 17 – 23 NATO fighter aircraft conducting the NATO Air Policing Mission in the Baltic states were scrambled two times to identify and escort military aircraft of the Russian Federation in international airspace over the Baltic Sea.



    On June 17 NATO Baltic Air Policing fighter aircraft intercepted one AN-24 flying from Kaliningrad to the mainland of the Russian Federation without using its onboard transponder, according to a pre-filed flight plan, maintaining radio communication with the regional air traffic control centre.



    On June 22 NATO fighter aircraft intercepted one TU-154 and two SU-24MRs and two SU-30SM in its escorts flying from Kaliningrad to mainland Russia. The TU-154 had is onboard transponder on, did not have the flight plan, did not maintain radio communication with the regional air traffic control centre. The two SU-24MRs and the two SU-30SMs had their onboard transponders off, did not have the flight plans, did not maintain radio communication.

    06.24 - 06.30.


    On June 24 – 30 NATO fighter aircraft conducting the NATO Air Policing Mission in the Baltic states were scrambled six times to identify and escort military aircraft of the Russian Federation in international airspace over the Baltic Sea.



    On June 24 NATO fighter aircraft intercepted one IL-76 flying from the mainland of the Russian Federation to Kaliningrad with its onboard transponder off, with a pre-filed flight plan, maintaining radio contact with the regional air traffic control centre.



    On June 25 NATO air policing fighter aircraft intercepted one AN-12 and two SU-27s escorting it from Kaliningrad to mainland Russia. The AN-12 had its onboard transponder off, flew according to a pre-filed flight plan, kept radio contact.



    On June 26 NATO fighter aircraft intercepted one TU-214 flying from mainland Russia to Kaliningrad with its onboard transponder off , according to a pre-filed flight plan, maintaining radio communication.



    On June 26 NATO Baltic air policing fighter aircraft intercepted one IL-76 flying from Kaliningrad to mainland Russia with its onboard transponder off , according to a pre-filed flight plan, maintaining radio communication.



    On June 29 NATO aircraft intercepted one IL-22 flying from Kaliningrad to mainland Russia with its onboard transponder on, according to a pre-filed flight plan, maintaining radio communication.



    On June 29 NATO aircraft intercepted two SU-27s flying from and back to the mainland of the Russian Federation with their onboard transponders off, without the flight plans, without keeping radio contact.
  • Terminator
    06.24 - 06.30.


    On June 24 – 30 NATO fighter aircraft conducting the NATO Air Policing Mission in the Baltic states were scrambled six times to identify and escort military aircraft of the Russian Federation in international airspace over the Baltic Sea.



    On June 24 NATO fighter aircraft intercepted one IL-76 flying from the mainland of the Russian Federation to Kaliningrad with its onboard transponder off, with a pre-filed flight plan, maintaining radio contact with the regional air traffic control centre.



    On June 25 NATO air policing fighter aircraft intercepted one AN-12 and two SU-27s escorting it from Kaliningrad to mainland Russia. The AN-12 had its onboard transponder off, flew according to a pre-filed flight plan, kept radio contact.



    On June 26 NATO fighter aircraft intercepted one TU-214 flying from mainland Russia to Kaliningrad with its onboard transponder off , according to a pre-filed flight plan, maintaining radio communication.



    On June 26 NATO Baltic air policing fighter aircraft intercepted one IL-76 flying from Kaliningrad to mainland Russia with its onboard transponder off , according to a pre-filed flight plan, maintaining radio communication.



    On June 29 NATO aircraft intercepted one IL-22 flying from Kaliningrad to mainland Russia with its onboard transponder on, according to a pre-filed flight plan, maintaining radio communication.



    On June 29 NATO aircraft intercepted two SU-27s flying from and back to the mainland of the Russian Federation with their onboard transponders off, without the flight plans, without keeping radio contact.

    07.01 - 07.07.


    On July 1 – 7 NATO fighter aircraft conducting the NATO Air Policing Mission in the Baltic states were scrambled three times to identify and escort military aircraft of the Russian Federation in international airspace over the Baltic Sea.



    On July 1 NATO fighter aircraft intercepted four SU-24 aircraft flying from Kaliningrad to mainland Russia with their onboard transponders off, without the flight plans, without maintaining radio contact with the regional air traffic control centre.



    On July 3 NATO air policing fighter aircraft intercepted one IL-76 flying from Kaliningrad to mainland Russia with its onboard transponder on, without the flight plan, maintaining radio communication with the regional air traffic control centre.



    On July 5 NATO fighter aircraft intercepted one IL-20 flying from mainland Russia to Kaliningrad with its onboard d transponder off, without the flight plan, maintaining radio contact with the regional air traffic control centre.
  • On July 8-12 arms control inspectors of Russia and Belarus will be visiting Lithuania on the basis of the Open Skies Treaty.

    The experts will conduct a reconnaissance overflight over the territory of Lithuania in an AN-30B aircraft of the Russian Armed Forces with digital cameras. Representatives of the Lithuanian Armed forces will be on board together with the Russian ad Belarussian inspectors during the flight to ensure the agreed flight plan is followed and the observation equipment certified according to the Open Skies Treaty requirements are used.

    Aerial reconnaissance flights on the basis of the Open Skies Treaty are conducted in order to verify the arms control agreements in force are respected by the overflown country. The flights can be carried out over the whole territory of the country with exceptions for flight safety reasons only.

    This is the first overflight in Lithuania under the Open Skies Treaty this year. Last flight Lithuania hosted from Russian and Belarusian arms control inspectors took place in August 2017. Ukraine’s arms control inspectors are also planned to carry out a reconnaissance flight over Lithuania this year.
  • Terminator
    07.01 - 07.07.


    On July 1 – 7 NATO fighter aircraft conducting the NATO Air Policing Mission in the Baltic states were scrambled three times to identify and escort military aircraft of the Russian Federation in international airspace over the Baltic Sea.



    On July 1 NATO fighter aircraft intercepted four SU-24 aircraft flying from Kaliningrad to mainland Russia with their onboard transponders off, without the flight plans, without maintaining radio contact with the regional air traffic control centre.



    On July 3 NATO air policing fighter aircraft intercepted one IL-76 flying from Kaliningrad to mainland Russia with its onboard transponder on, without the flight plan, maintaining radio communication with the regional air traffic control centre.



    On July 5 NATO fighter aircraft intercepted one IL-20 flying from mainland Russia to Kaliningrad with its onboard d transponder off, without the flight plan, maintaining radio contact with the regional air traffic control centre.

    07.08 - 07.15.


    On July 8 – 14 NATO fighter aircraft conducting the NATO Air Policing Mission in the Baltic states were scrambled two times to identify and escort military aircraft of the Russian Federation in international airspace over the Baltic Sea.



    On July 8 NATO air policing fighter aircraft intercepted one IL-20 and two SU-27s flying from and to Kaliningrad. None of the aircraft had their onboard transponders on, flight plans or kept radio communication with the regional air traffic control centre.



    On July 11 NATO fighter aircraft intercepted one IL-20 flying from Kaliningrad to the mainland of the Russian Federation with its onboard transponder off, according to a pre-filed flight plan, maintaining radio communication with the regional air traffic control centre.
  • Terminator
    07.08 - 07.14.


    On July 8 – 14 NATO fighter aircraft conducting the NATO Air Policing Mission in the Baltic states were scrambled two times to identify and escort military aircraft of the Russian Federation in international airspace over the Baltic Sea.



    On July 8 NATO air policing fighter aircraft intercepted one IL-20 and two SU-27s flying from and to Kaliningrad. None of the aircraft had their onboard transponders on, flight plans or kept radio communication with the regional air traffic control centre.



    On July 11 NATO fighter aircraft intercepted one IL-20 flying from Kaliningrad to the mainland of the Russian Federation with its onboard transponder off, according to a pre-filed flight plan, maintaining radio communication with the regional air traffic control centre.


    07.15 - 07.21.



    On July 15 – 21 NATO fighter aircraft conducting the NATO Air Policing Mission in the Baltic states were scrambled four times to identify and escort military aircraft of the Russian Federation in international airspace over the Baltic Sea.



    On July 15 NATO Baltic air policing fighter aircraft intercepted two TU-160 aircraft and two SU-27 fighters escorting them, and one A-50 heading south of the mainland of the Russian Federation. None of the aircraft kept radio contact with the regional air traffic control centre and none had flight plans. Only one of all the aircraft, one of the TU-160s, had its onboard transponder on.



    On July 15 NATO fighter aircraft intercepted two Su-35s flying from the mainland of the Russian Federation south to meet the returning two TU-160s and one A-50. Neither of the two Su-35s had their onboard transponders on, kept radio communication or had the flight plans.



    On July 18 NATO fighter aircraft intercepted one AN-24 flying from mainland Russia to Kaliningrad with its onboard transponder malfunctioning, according to a flight plan, maintaining radio communication with the regional air traffic control centre.



    On July 19 NATO air policing fighter aircraft intercepted one AN-24 flying from Kaliningrad to mainland Russia with onboard transponder off, according to a pre-filed flight plan, maintaining radio communication with the regional air traffic control centre.
  • Arms control inspectors of Ukraine to conduct an observation flight over the territory of Lithuania

    On July 22–26 arms control inspectors of Ukraine are visiting Lithuania. The experts are conducting a reconnaissance overflight over the territory of Lithuania in an AN-30B aircraft with specialised digital cameras of the Armed Forces of Ukraine on the basis of the Open Skies Treaty.
  • 07.22 - 07.28.

    On July 22 – 28 NATO fighter aircraft conducting the NATO Air Policing Mission in the Baltic states were scrambled twice to identify and escort military aircraft of the Russian Federation in international airspace over the Baltic Sea.

    On July 22 NATO Baltic air policing fighter aircraft intercepted one SU-24 flying from mainland Russia to Kaliningrad with its onboard transponder off, without the flight plan, without maintaining radio communication with the regional air traffic control centre.

    On July 28 NATO fighter aircraft intercepted one IL-76 flying from Kaliningrad to mainland Russia with its onboard transponder on, without the flight plan, keeping the radio communication.


    07.22 - 07.28.

    On July 29 – August 4 NATO fighter aircraft conducting the NATO Air Policing Mission in the Baltic states carried out 14 alert scrambles to identify and escort military aircraft of the Russian Federation in international airspace over the Baltic Sea.

    On July 29 NATO fighter aircraft intercepted three SU-24s flying from the mainland of the Russian Federation to Kaliningrad with their onboard transponders off, without the pre-filed flight plans, and without maintaining radio communication with the regional air traffic control centre.

    On July 29 NATO air policing fighter aircraft intercepted one AN-26 flying from mainland Russia to Kaliningrad according to a pre-filed flight plan, without using its onboard transponder, maintaining radio communication.

    On July 30 NATO aircraft guarding the Baltic skies intercepted one AN-26 flying from mainland Russia to Kaliningrad according to a pre-filed flight plan and keeping radio communication but with its onboard transponder off.

    On July 31 NATO fighter aircraft intercepted one A-50 aircraft flying from mainland Russia to Kaliningrad with its onboard transponder off, without the flight plan, keeping radio communication with the regional air traffic control centre.

    On July 31 NATO fighter aircraft intercepted two IL-38 aircraft on heading for Kaliningrad from the mainland of the Russian Federation with their onboard transponders off, according to pre-filed flight plans, without maintaining radio communication.

    On July NATO Baltic air policing fighter aircraft intercepted one AN-26 aircraft flying from mainland Russia to Kaliningrad with its onboard transponder off, with a flight plan, maintaining radio communication.

    On August 1 NATO fighter aircraft intercepted one IL-38 and two SU-27 aircraft flying from Kaliningrad and back, without the flight plans, onboard transponders off, without maintaining radio communication.

    On August 1 NATO fighter aircraft intercepted one AN-26 flying from Kaliningrad to mainland Russia with its onboard transponder off, according to a pre-filed flight plan, maintaining radio communication with the regional air traffic control centre.

    On August 1 NATO air policing fighter aircraft intercepted two SU-24 aircraft flying from Kaliningrad and back with their onboard transponders off, without the flight plans, without maintaining radio communication.

    On August 1 NATO fighter aircraft intercepted two SU-24 aircraft flying from mainland Russia to Kaliningrad with their onboard transponders off, without the flight plans, without maintaining radio communication.

    On August 2 NATO fighter aircraft intercepted two SU-27 and one IL-38 aircraft training in an exercise over the Baltic Sea, the aircraft took off from Kaliningrad and flew back to Kaliningrad, without using the onboard transponders, without the flight plans, without maintaining radio communication.

    On August 2 NATO fighter aircraft conducting the Air Policing Mission in the Baltic states intercepted two SU-27 aircraft which took off from Kaliningrad and later returned to Kaliningrad while training in an exercise in the airspace over the Baltic Sea. Onboard transponders of the aircraft were off, no flight plans had been pre-filed, radio communication was not kept.

    On August 2 NATO fighter aircraft intercepted one IL-38 aircraft training in an exercise over the Baltic Sea, the aircraft flew from and back to Kaliningrad with its onboard transponder off, without the flight plan, without maintaining radio communication with the regional air traffic control centre.

    On August 4 NATO fighter aircraft intercepted one A-50 and two SU-27 aircraft flying from Kaliningrad to mainland Russia. The A-50 had its onboard transponder off, maintained radio communication and had the flight plan, neither of the SU-227s had the flight plans, nor maintained radio communications, their radio transponders were off.
  • 07.29 – 08.04.


    On July 29 – August 4 NATO fighter aircraft conducting the NATO Air Policing Mission in the Baltic states carried out 14 alert scrambles to identify and escort military aircraft of the Russian Federation in international airspace over the Baltic Sea.



    On July 29 NATO fighter aircraft intercepted three SU-24s flying from the mainland of the Russian Federation to Kaliningrad with their onboard transponders off, without the pre-filed flight plans, and without maintaining radio communication with the regional air traffic control centre.



    On July 29 NATO air policing fighter aircraft intercepted one AN-26 flying from mainland Russia to Kaliningrad according to a pre-filed flight plan, without using its onboard transponder, maintaining radio communication.



    On July 30 NATO aircraft guarding the Baltic skies intercepted one AN-26 flying from mainland Russia to Kaliningrad according to a pre-filed flight plan and keeping radio communication but with its onboard transponder off.



    On July 31 NATO fighter aircraft intercepted one A-50 aircraft flying from mainland Russia to Kaliningrad with its onboard transponder off, without the flight plan, keeping radio communication with the regional air traffic control centre.



    On July 31 NATO fighter aircraft intercepted two IL-38 aircraft on heading for Kaliningrad from the mainland of the Russian Federation with their onboard transponders off, according to pre-filed flight plans, without maintaining radio communication.



    On July NATO Baltic air policing fighter aircraft intercepted one AN-26 aircraft flying from mainland Russia to Kaliningrad with its onboard transponder off, with a flight plan, maintaining radio communication.



    On August 1 NATO fighter aircraft intercepted one IL-38 and two SU-27 aircraft flying from Kaliningrad and back, without the flight plans, onboard transponders off, without maintaining radio communication.



    On August 1 NATO fighter aircraft intercepted one AN-26 flying from Kaliningrad to mainland Russia with its onboard transponder off, according to a pre-filed flight plan, maintaining radio communication with the regional air traffic control centre.



    On August 1 NATO air policing fighter aircraft intercepted two SU-24 aircraft flying from Kaliningrad and back with their onboard transponders off, without the flight plans, without maintaining radio communication.



    On August 1 NATO fighter aircraft intercepted two SU-24 aircraft flying from mainland Russia to Kaliningrad with their onboard transponders off, without the flight plans, without maintaining radio communication.



    On August 2 NATO fighter aircraft intercepted two SU-27 and one IL-38 aircraft training in an exercise over the Baltic Sea, the aircraft took off from Kaliningrad and flew back to Kaliningrad, without using the onboard transponders, without the flight plans, without maintaining radio communication.



    On August 2 NATO fighter aircraft conducting the Air Policing Mission in the Baltic states intercepted two SU-27 aircraft which took off from Kaliningrad and later returned to Kaliningrad while training in an exercise in the airspace over the Baltic Sea. Onboard transponders of the aircraft were off, no flight plans had been pre-filed, radio communication was not kept.



    On August 2 NATO fighter aircraft intercepted one IL-38 aircraft training in an exercise over the Baltic Sea, the aircraft flew from and back to Kaliningrad with its onboard transponder off, without the flight plan, without maintaining radio communication with the regional air traffic control centre.



    On August 4 NATO fighter aircraft intercepted one A-50 and two SU-27 aircraft flying from Kaliningrad to mainland Russia. The A-50 had its onboard transponder off, maintained radio communication and had the flight plan, neither of the SU-227s had the flight plans, nor maintained radio communications, their radio transponders were off.



    08.05 – 08.11.


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    On August 5 –11 NATO fighter aircraft conducting the NATO Air Policing Mission in the Baltic states carried out 9 alert scrambles to identify and escort military aircraft of the Russian Federation in international airspace over the Baltic Sea.



    On August 5 NATO fighter aircraft intercepted two SU-27s that took off from Kaliningrad to escort one TU-142 which took off from the mainland Russia. None of the aircraft had their onboard transponders on, none had flight plans, and none kept radio communication with the regional air traffic control centre.



    On August 5 NATO air policing fighter aircraft intercepted two SU-27s flying from Kaliningrad to Latvia’s Flight Information Region (FIR) and back. Their onboard transponders were off, no flight plans had been pre-filed, radio communication was not maintained.



    On August 6 NATO fighter aircraft intercepted one TU-134 which trespassed into the airspace of the Republic of Lithuania because of the poor weather conditions over the Baltic Sea. The aircraft had its onboard transponder switched on, the crew flew according to a pre-filed flight plan and maintained radio communication.



    On August 6 fighter aircraft conducting the NATO Air Policing Mission intercepted two SU-27 and two IL-38 aircraft flying from Kaliningrad to mainland Russia with their onboard transponders off, according to a flight plan, maintaining radio communication.



    On August 7 NATO fighter aircraft intercepted one AN-26 flying from Kaliningrad to the mainland of the Russian Federation with its onboard transponder off, according to a flight plan, maintaining radio communication.



    On August 8 NATO fighter aircraft intercepted one TU-142 flying into the international airspace over the Baltic Sea from mainland Russia and then back, and two SU-30 flying into the international airspace over the Baltic Sea from Kaliningrad and back. The TU-142 and two SU-30 had their onboard transponders off, did not have flights plans, and did not maintain radio communication.



    On August 8 NATO fighter aircraft intercepted one SU-27 flying into the international airspace over the Baltic Sea from Kaliningrad and then back without using the onboard transponder, without the flight plan, without maintaining radio communication.



    On August 8 NATO air policing fighter aircraft intercepted two SU-30s flying from Kaliningrad into the international airspace over the Baltic Sea and back without using their onboard transponders, without the flight plans, without maintaining radio communication.



    On August 10 NATO fighter aircraft intercepted two SU-27 aircraft flying from Kaliningrad into the international airspace over the Baltic Sea and back in order to escort one TU-134 which was flying from mainland Russia to Kaliningrad. Neither of the SU-27s had their onboard transponders on, neither had the flight plans, and neither maintained radio communication. The TU-134 had its onboard transponder on, the flight plan, and maintained radio communication.
  • Terminator
    07.29 – 08.04.
    08.05 – 08.11.


    08.12 – 08.18.

    On 12-18 August, the fighter aircraft performing NATO air police functions in the Baltic states were 9 times identified and accompanied by the international space of the Russian Federation (RF) military airplanes on the Baltic Sea.



    12 August NATO Air police fighter aircraft have taken over and recognized two RF-27 airplanes, WITH an international airspace from the RF Kaliningrad area and back to the RF Kaliningrad region, an escort A-50 from the RF mainland to the Kaliningrad region. Aircraft WITH-27 and A-50 flew without radar transponders, did not have flight plans, radio communication with the Regional Air Traffic Control Centre (RSVC) was not supported.



    13 August NATO Air police fighter jets in international airspace have taken over and identified two RF aircraft WITH-27, flying from the RF Kaliningrad region and back to the RF Kaliningrad Oblast, to an escort of the T-204 of another RF aircraft from the RF mainland to the Kaliningrad region. Aircraft WITH-27 flew without radar responder, had no flight plan, no radio-RSVC was supported, another aircraft – T-204 flew with radar response, the flight plan had, radio communication with RSVC supported.



    13 August NATO Air police fighter jets in international airspace have taken over and identified two RF aircraft WITH-27 and one T-204 flying from the RF Kaliningrad area to the RF mainland. Aircraft WITH-27 flew without radar responder, had no flight plan, no radio-RSVC was supported, another aircraft – T-204 flew with radar response, the flight plan had, radio communication with RSVC supported.



    13 August NATO Air police fighter jets in international airspace have taken over and identified two RF aircraft WITH-27 and one T-134 flying from the RF Kaliningrad area to the RF mainland. Aircraft WITH-27 flew without radar responder, had no flight plan, no radio-RSVC was supported, another aircraft – T-134 flew with radar response, the flight plan had, radio communication with RSVC supported.



    14 August NATO Air Police fighters in international airspace identified AN RF aircraft of AN-26, which sailed from the RF mainland to the RF Kaliningrad region. Aircraft AN-26 flew without a working radar transponder, the flight plan had to have a radio connection with RSVC not supported.



    14 August NATO Air police fighter jets in international airspace identified the RF aircraft TU-214PU, which sailed from the RF mainland to the RF Kaliningrad region and back to the RF mainland, without a stopovers. Aircraft TU-214PU flew with an operating radar transponder, had no flight plan, radio communication with RSVC supported.



    15 August NATO Air Police fighters in international airspace identified AN RF aircraft of AN-26, which sailed from the RF mainland to the RF Kaliningrad region. Aircraft AN-26 flew without a functioning radar transponder, the flight plan had to be radio-RSVC not supported.



    15 August NATO Air police fighter jets in international airspace have taken over and recognized RF aircraft A-50, fly from the RF Kaliningrad area to the RF mainland. Aircraft A-50 flew without radar transponder, the flight plan had, radio communication with RSVC did not support.



    15 August NATO Air Police fighters in international airspace identified the RF aircraft WITH-34, which sailed from the RF mainland to the RF Kaliningrad region. Aircraft with-34 flew without a working radar transponder, the flight plan did not have a radio connection with RSVC was not supported.
  • 08.19 – 08.25.


    "On August 19-25 NATO fighters conducting the Air Policing Mission over the Baltic states were scrambled three times to identify and escort military aircraft of the Russian Federation flying in international airspace over the Baltic Sea.



    On August 19 NATO fighter aircraft conducting the Air Policing Mission in the Baltic states identified two SU-30 of the Russian Federation flying from Kaliningrad District of Russian Federation to the mainland of Russian Federation. Both aircraft SU-30 were according to a pre-filed flight plan, maintained radio connection with regional flight centre, their on-board transponder was off.



    On August 20 the NATO fighter aircraft conducting the Air Policing Mission in the Baltic states identified two aircraft: SU-34 and T-134. SU-34 was flying from Kaliningrad District of Russian Federation to the mainland Russia with the on-board transponder off, without a flight plan, maintained no radio connection with regional flight centre. T-134 was flying from Kaliningrad District of Russian Federation to the mainland Russia with the on-board transponder on, with a flight plan, maintained radio connection with regional flight centre.



    On August 21 the NATO fighter aircraft conducting the Air Policing Mission in the Baltic states identified two aircraft SU-27,aircraft IL-76 and two aircraft SU-30. Both aircraft SU-27 were flying from Kaliningrad District of Russian Federation to the mainland Russia with the on-board transponder off, without a flight plan, maintained no radio connection with regional flight centre. IL-76 was flying from mainland Russia to Kaliningrad District of Russian Federation with the on-board transponder on, with a flight plan, maintained radio connection with regional flight centre. Both SU-30 were flying over the Baltic sea to mainland Russia of Russian Federation with the on-board transponder off, without a flight plan, maintained no radio connection with regional flight centre."
  • 08.26 – 09.01.

    "On 26 August - 1 September NATO fighters conducting the Air Policing Mission over the Baltic states were scrambled 11 times to identify and escort military aircraft of the Russian Federation flying in international airspace over the Baltic Sea.


    On August 26th, the NATO Air police fighter aircraft identified the RF IL-20 flight of the international airspace from the RF mainland to the RF Kaliningrad region. In the IL-20 flew without the operation of the radar transponder, the flight plan had to have radio communication with the Regional Air Traffic Control Centre (RSVC) supported.



    On 27 August, NATO Air Police fighters identified two RF aircraft WITH-35 and IL-76 flying international airspace from the RF mainland to the RF Kaliningrad region. Both SU-35 flew without radar responder, the flight plan did not have, the radio connection with RSVC did not support, IL-76 flew with the radar response, the flight plan had a radio connection with RSVC supported. NATO aircraft also took over the two SU-27, which sailed from Kaliningrad to meet and escort IL-76. Both SU-27 flew without radar transponder, the flight plan did not have, radio communication with RSVC was not supported.



    On 28 August, NATO Air Police fighter aircraft recognized the RF-24MR flying international airspace from the RF mainland to the RF Kaliningrad region. SU-24MR flew without a working radar transponder, the flight plan did not have a radio connection with RSVC was not supported.



    On 28 August, NATO Air Police fighter aircraft identified AN RF flight of AN-24 with AN international airspace from the RF mainland to the RF Kaliningrad region. AN-24 flew without a functioning radar transponder, the flight plan had, radio-RSVC did not support. NATO aircraft also took over and identified the RF aircraft IL-76, which sailed from the RF Kaliningrad region to the RF mainland. IL-76 flew with an operating radar transponder, the flight plan had to have a radio connection with RSVC supported. IL-76 was accompanied by two SU-27 who turned around and returned back to the Kaliningrad region. Both SU-27 flew without radar transponder, the flight plan did not have, radio communication with RSVC was not supported.



    On 28 August, NATO Air Police fighters identified AN RF aircraft with AN International air space from the RF mainland to the RF Kaliningrad region. AN-12 flew without a working radar transponder, the flight plan had a radio connection with RSVC supported.



    On 29 August, NATO Air Police fighter aircraft had identified the IL-20 RF on its international airspace from the RF Kaliningrad region to RF Kaliningrad. The IL-20 flew without the operation of the radar transponder, did not have a flight plan, radio communication with RSVC was not supported.



    On 29 August, NATO Air Police fighters identified an RF aircraft WITH-24M flying international airspace from the RF Kaliningrad region to the RF mainland. With-24M flew without a working radar transponder, the flight plan did not have a radio connection with RSVC was not supported.



    On 29 August, NATO Air police fighter jets identified two RF aircraft WITH-24MR flying international airspace from the RF Kaliningrad area to the RF mainland. SU-24MR flew without a working radar transponder, the flight plan had to, radio communication with RSVC did not support.



    On 30 August, NATO Air Police fighter aircraft identified AN RF-12 and AN-26 airplanes from the RF Kaliningrad area to the RF mainland. AN-12 flew without a working radar transponder, the flight plan had a radio connection with RSVC supported. AN-26 flew with radar transponder, the flight plan had a radio connection with RSVC supported.



    On 30 August, NATO Air Police fighter aircraft identified the IL-20 RF on the mainland of the RF Kaliningrad region. The IL-20 flew without a working radar transponder, the flight plan had to have a radio connection with RSVC supported.



    On 30 August, NATO Air Police fighter aircraft identified an RF-30, flying international airspace from the RF Kaliningrad area and back RF Kaliningrad. With-30 flew without a working radar transponder, the flight plan did not have a radio connection with RSVC was not supported."
  • Terminator
    08.19 – 08.25.
    Terminator
    08.26 – 09.01."
    Mint ahogy már írtam a másik topicban...
    Ostoba, gyerekes farokméregetés az egész Baltic Air Policy.
    A NATO gépek kísérgetik az orosz katonai gépeket nemzetközi légtérben, ők meg már csak azért sem hajlandók transpondert kapcsolni és rádiózni.
    A végén ennek is az lesz a vége hogy valaki lever egy civil utasgépet.
  • Terminator
    "Ennek az egész kontingensnek és műveletnek a leggyakrabban félreértett része, hogy az oroszok megsértik a balti államok légterét, és az aktuális NATO tagországok légierejének ezt kell megakadályozni, a behatolókat elfogni. Nem erről van szó... Arról van szó, hogy a oroszok a nemzetközi légtérben nem követnek szabályokat, az azonosítás céljából és ennek érdekében emelnek rájuk (is) gépeket, hogy a NATO országok pilótái vizuálisan azonosítsák őket. "
    Az idézett részt én nem találtam a linkelt cikkben, viszont akkor legyen meg itt is hogy nemzetközi légtérben a repülési terv, transponder, rádiózás az illetékes ATC-vel csak a CIVIL gépekre vonatkozik, az állami légijárművekre NEM.
    Tőlük legfeljebb a légiforgalom biztonsága érdekében elvárható hogy kapcsoljanak transpondert és rádiózzanak, de ha nem teszik akkor sem szegnek meg semmilyen szabályt.
    A megoldás mindenképp valami kölcsönös kompromisszum lehet. A NATO-nak abba kellene hagynia az Orosz gépek basztatását, az Oroszoknak meg minimum transpondert kellene kapcsolniuk és be kellene jelentkezniük az adott frekin hogy elérhetőek legyenek ha van valami.
  • rudi
    Az FAA engedélyezte hogy az USA állami repülőgépek - ha úgy ítélik meg hogy az indokolt - kikapcsolt transzponderrel repüljenek.
    Azt hiszem ezek után még nehezebb lesz bármilyen kikapcsolt transzponderes repülést számon kérni az oroszokon.
    Eddig is így repültek - orosz állítás szerint - Kalinyingrád közelében, nemzetközi légtérben. És nem csak az USA gépei, de például a svéd légierő elektronikai felderítői is. Nem is egyszer. Csak annyi történt, hogy most már pecsétes papírjuk is van róla, hogy ez nem bűn. Nekik.

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